Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Quinoa Cornbread Muffins




I had read somewhere (most definitely a blog!) that there is no greater satisfaction than biting into a warm Cornbread Muffin with pat of butter. I wouldn't know, coz I never had a Cornbread Muffin. My mom never made one. Nor did my grandma.

But a damp, cold Monday in April finally gave me the pleasure of biting into a soft warm corn muffin with a dab of butter.

It was pure bliss!




The warm and delicious Cornbread Muffin in question is further fortified with additional protein and fiber, thanks to the addition of cooked quinoa. The quinoa not only brings up the nutrition quotient, but also brings in a subtle nutty flavor and softness to the muffins.

These muffins are practically mini meals in themselves. Soft and fluffy with moist crumbs and loaded with proteins and fiber, they are low on Glycemic Index, which helps keep the blood sugar stable.




I have kept the flavor profile neutral with just a subtle hint of cheese. They are the perfect vessel to soak up the amazing flavor of soups, stews and chili. But please feel free to add herbs, greens, shredded veggies, and/or beans of choice for a more substantial and filling muffins.



These muffins are best enjoyed warm, with a pat of butter and a cozy bowl of chili, stew or soup. But they are equally good on their own with your cup of Joe or tea. A great option for breakfast or afternoon snack.

Note: My friends in India can easily make these delicious and nutritious muffins with Amaranth/Rajgira in place of Quinoa and Makki (Makai) ka Aata in place of Cornmeal.

Recipe Snapshot: Quinoa Cornbread Muffins


Serves: 8 serving
(1 serving = 2 pcs)

What I used:
Cooked Quinoa - 1.5 cups

Coarse Yellow Cornmeal - 1 cup

Baking Powder - 2 tsp

Baking Soda - 2 tsp

Grated Parmesan - 1/4 cup

White Sugar - 4 tsp

Salt - 1/2 tsp

Eggs - 2

Milk - 1 cup (I used 1% milk)

Olive Oil - 2 tbsp

Freshly cracked pepper - 1/2 tsp

What I did:
1. Preheat the oven at 375 F and gently spray a 12 cup muffin tin with a non-stick spray or use silicon cup liners.

2. In large mixing bowl, combine cooked quinoa, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, grated Parmesan, salt and sugar. Give the dry ingredients a good mix.

3. In a measuring cup, combine 1 cup of milk, eggs, olive oil and black pepper. Whisk well.

4. Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ones and mix just until just combined with no dry spots. It's extremely important not to over-mix the batter.

5. Fill the 3/4 of the muffin tin and bake in the preheated oven for 20 to 25 mins or until the top is golden brown and tester inserted into the middle of the muffins comes out clean. Start checking after the 15 minute mark. The quinoa cornbread can tun from underdone to overdone in a matter of moments.

6. Remove the cornbread from the oven. Add a dab of butter and serve warm with a chili/ soup or Stew of choice. Or enjoy it with a cup of hot coffee or tea.

Note: My friends in India can easily make these delicious and nutritious muffins with Amaranth/Rajgira in place of Quinoa and Makki (Makai) ka Aata in place of Cornmeal.

You can add any herb, shredded veggies, chopped greens and /or any cooked beans of choice for a more substantial and filling muffins.

Instead of a muffin tin, the batter can be baked in loaf tin or a round or a square tin to make regular Cornbread. The bake time will be somewhere in between 40 to 50 minutes.

Diabetic Platter:
Perhaps the most striking health benefit provided by quinoa is its overall nutrient richness. One of the shortcomings overcome by quinoa involves its protein content. Most grains are considered to be inadequate as total protein sources because they lack adequate amounts of the amino acids lysine and isoleucine. The relatively low level of both lysine and isoleucine in the protein of grains is what causes these amino acids to be considered as the limiting amino acids (LAAs) in grains. In other words, these LAAs prevent grains from serving as complete protein sources in our diet. By contrast, quinoa has significantly greater amounts of both lysine and isoleucine (especially lysine), and these greater amounts of lysine and isoleucine allow the protein in quinoa to serve as a complete protein source.

Read More: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=142
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